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Kat Loco solves your movement problems in VR

KAT VR has already managed to raise a target of $ 50,000 Kickstarter. When it comes to moving in virtual reality (VR), most players are accustomed to either teleporting or smoothly moving through a few room-scale tricks. But there are other ways you can explore depending on how exciting you want the experience to be […]

HTC will reveal information about Vive Cosmos next week.

HTC Tweet reads: “We’re discovering the #HTC VIVE COSMOS story! We have so many details that we would like to share. Stay with us on social networks next week to stay up to date with Cosmos history. We will come to you soon with information on availability and release dates in the near future. ” […]

The virtual reality club Anvio pleased all fans of shooters with a new VR-game – “City -…

On June 15, the continuation of the City Z zombie shooter, which has already attracted the attention of gamers to virtual reality in Russia, became available in all Anvio VR clubs. Anvio team significantly improved the gameplay, added 7 new levels and made the monsters even more insidious and taught to attack in response. In […]

The virtual reality club Anvio pleased all fans of shooters with a new VR-game – “City -…

On June 15, the continuation of the City Z zombie shooter, which has already attracted the attention of gamers to virtual reality in Russia, became available in all Anvio VR clubs. Anvio team significantly improved the gameplay, added 7 new levels and made the monsters even more insidious and taught to attack in response. In […]

E3 2019: Arizona Sunshine Zombie Shooter will be released on Oculus Quest

The release date of Arizona Sunshine-The Damned DLC is now known. At Electronic Entertainment Expo (E3) 2019 this week Vertigo Games announced their next major virtual reality project (VR) Until Down. But that’s not all, the studio is working to make the Arizona Sunshine flagship experience even more affordable by porting it to the Oculus […]

E3 2019: Beat Saber in 360 mode on Oculus Quest feels like a new game

Beat Games is a studio that simply does not stop there. This week they not only released a new music band for Beat Saber with licensed music from Imagine Dragons, but also presented 360-degree versions of two new songs (Believer and Thunder) on E3 2019. As a result, when you first look at the new […]

Sling TV now supports multiplayer viewing on Oculus Go

Sling TV on Oculus TV now supports multiplayer viewing. This means that if you and your friends are Sling TV subscribers, you will be able to watch movies together in VR from anywhere using Oculus Go. Sling TV is a streaming television service available on many platforms. Channels available in various packages include Disney Channel, […]

Oculus Quest: Top 10 best games to buy on the day of VR helmet release

Do not buy anything until you read this list! So, you spent your hard-earned money on a beautiful new Oculus Quest headset, and now you need amazing content to use for its intended purpose. The difficulty of the choice lies in what it is worth buying from the extensive range of games, so VRcue is […]

Oculus Quest: All You Need to Know

Is this the headset everyone was waiting for? When Oculus Rift came out in 2016, it marked a turning point in the video game industry, offering a new entertainment environment that opened the door to exciting virtual worlds with which you could physically interact. But there were limitations, and, as we know, it was not […]

Kat Loco solves your movement problems in VR

KAT VR has already managed to raise a target of $ 50,000 Kickstarter. When it comes to moving in virtual reality (VR), most players are accustomed to either teleporting or smoothly moving through a few room-scale tricks. But there are other ways you can explore depending on how exciting you want the experience to be […]

HTC will reveal information about Vive Cosmos next week.

HTC Tweet reads: “We’re discovering the #HTC VIVE COSMOS story! We have so many details that we would like to share. Stay with us on social networks next week to stay up to date with Cosmos history. We will come to you soon with information on availability and release dates in the near future. ” […]

E3 2019: Arizona Sunshine Zombie Shooter will be released on Oculus Quest

The release date of Arizona Sunshine-The Damned DLC is now known. At Electronic Entertainment Expo (E3) 2019 this week Vertigo Games announced their next major virtual reality project (VR) Until Down. But that’s not all, the studio is working to make the Arizona Sunshine flagship experience even more affordable by porting it to the Oculus […]

Will augmented and virtual reality change social media?

Do you remember the storm turning a video game called Pokemon GO into the mainstream? You must have noticed not only the teenagers, but also the adults walking the streets with their looks fixed on their phones, as if they were on a big treasure hunt. Video game with integrated functions of augmented reality (AR) […]

Virtual desktop now allows you to play computer games on Oculus Quest with sen …

Virtual desktop for Oculus Quest now allows you to play your computer games using your own Quest touch controllers. Previously, you could connect an Xbox controller or similar Bluetooth gamepad and use it on a virtual desktop. This feature is also available on the Oculus Go version of the application. But not every Quest owner […]

Apple’s new ARKit 3 has triple face tracking

New items in Apple’s AR line are Reality Composer and RealityKit. Apple held its annual WWDC developer conference and unveiled its latest plans for Augmented Reality (AR), in particular ARKit. Originally released in 2017 along with iOS 11, the software changes in 2019 when Apple launches ARKit 3 with some major additions, such as people […]

Understanding what Virtual Reality is

Virtual Reality technology has developed rapidly in recent years. Any definition of Virtual Reality may become untimely after a year or two. Here, we try to get out of the technical details of the moment to discuss the basic principles of virtual reality, so that the understanding of VR will not become obsolete too quickly. The first problem that we need to solve is to define “virtual reality” by working out the most critical aspects of virtual reality from the technical details of today’s rapid innovation. This definition must be broad enough to explain what virtual reality looks like today and to reflect the future of virtual reality that we can see.

Wearing a VR helmet for a perceptual experience also satisfies this definition. But how far does our definition of “virtual reality” allow our discussion to deviate from these common examples? Maybe listening to music on headphones is virtual reality? Is it true to watch a movie in the cinema? Obviously, these technologies also provide artificial sensory stimulation through projection devices and sound systems. Can we go a little further, portraits or oil paintings hanging on the wall are virtual reality? The painter came to the canvas and pigments to help us create artificial sensory stimulation. Finally, we can even think that reading fiction is also a virtual reality experience. Authors create another world experience for us through writing and printing. Novels stimulate our visual senses, but this stimulation is not as straightforward as movie screens and sound devices. Here, we don’t spend too much thinking about where we define the boundaries of virtual reality. As long as we have a little “tuning “, these ambiguous examples of boundaries can be considered or not as examples of virtual reality

When animals explore their surroundings, a neural structure consisting of “place cells” is generated in animals that encode spatial information and the surrounding environment. Every time the animal reaches a location in the environment, the corresponding “grid cells” in this nerve structure is activated. Although we haven’t figured out some of these details, coordinate cells encode coordinates very similar to the Cartesian coordinate system. Scientists have discovered that in the virtual reality experience, this nerve structure in the organism will also be constructed. This means that our brain generates location cells for locations that don’t exist in reality! This means that our brain has been deceived! Our brain does not perceive, or at least in some respects, that the stimulus it gets is not true. Now, maybe you’ll go back and think, when reading a novel, does the brain create location cells for places in the book that don’t exist?

Further, we would even wonder whether our brain has been deceived? We may all perceive the virtual world, and the larger real world has never unveiled its veil. This possibility has always attracted the greatest philosophers in history. In Plato’s “Ideal Country,” there is a chapter called “The Cave Metaphor,” which describes a group of people shackled in the depths of the cave, with a white wall in front of them, and when someone walks through the outside world can only see the shadow projected on the white wall. Plato claims that philosophers are like those who eventually get freedom from the hole and see the real world. This idea has been constantly reformulated and developed throughout history and is deeply associated with neurological and religious ideas.

In 1641, René Descartes assumed that there was an “evil demon” in the world, who did everything to create the illusion of the outer physical world to deceive mankind. In 1973, Gilbert Harman proposed the famous thought experiment “The Brain in the Cylinder”, which is perhaps a viable way for Cartesian’s “demons” to create illusions. This thought experiment inspired the 1999 film The Matrix. In this film, the artificial intelligence system “Matrix” connects human computers to a virtual world that is completely fake, thereby deceiving the entire human being and occupying the human world. The protagonist in the film must choose whether to summon up the courage to face the real world or to take a memory erase pill to continue living in a comfortable virtual world.

A virtual reality thought experiment, 1973 Gilbert Harman proposed the brain in the cylinder (provided by Alexander Wivel). The term “virtual reality” was first used by the German philosopher Emmanuel Kant, the term “virtual reality”, but in the context of Kant, it has nothing to do with technology. The popularity of “virtual reality” in contemporary society dates back to Jaron Lanier in the 1980s. The term “virtual reality” is an all-encompassing term, and several confusing phrases related to its meaning are widely used. “virtual environments” had been widely disseminated before virtual reality came into fire, and many researchers in universities now love the term. “Virtual environments” are often considered synonymous with virtual reality; here, we emphasize that a user perceives a virtual environment as data from a real environment that is collected in advance or a completely artificial world. Augmented reality (AR) systems typically overlay virtual visuals on the user’s real world with cameras or glasses and pass them to the user’s eyes. Mixed reality (MR) is often used to refer to a collection of virtual implementations, augmented reality and real realisation worlds.

Further, we would even wonder whether our brain has been deceived? We may all perceive the virtual world, and the larger real world has never unveiled its veil. This possibility has always attracted the greatest philosophers in history. In Plato’s “Ideal Country,” there is a chapter called “The Cave Metaphor,” which describes a group of people shackled in the depths of the cave, with a white wall in front of them, and when someone walks through the outside world can only see the shadow projected on the white wall. Plato claims that philosophers are like those who eventually get freedom from the hole and see the real world. This idea has been constantly reformulated and developed throughout history and is deeply associated with neurological and religious ideas.

In 1641, René Descartes assumed that there was an “evil demon” in the world, who did everything to create the illusion of the outer physical world to deceive mankind. In 1973, Gilbert Harman proposed the famous thought experiment “The Brain in the Cylinder”, which is perhaps a viable way for Cartesian’s “demons” to create illusions. This thought experiment inspired the 1999 film The Matrix. In this film, the artificial intelligence system “Matrix” connects human computers to a virtual world that is completely fake, thereby deceiving the entire human being and occupying the human world. The protagonist in the film must choose whether to summon up the courage to face the real world or to take a memory erase pill to continue living in a comfortable virtual world.

A virtual reality thought experiment, 1973 Gilbert Harman proposed the brain in the cylinder (provided by Alexander Wivel). The term “virtual reality” was first used by the German philosopher Emmanuel Kant, the term “virtual reality”, but in the context of Kant, it has nothing to do with technology. The popularity of “virtual reality” in contemporary society dates back to Jaron Lanier in the 1980s. The term “virtual reality” is an all-encompassing term, and several confusing phrases related to its meaning are widely used. “virtual environments” had been widely disseminated before virtual reality came into fire, and many researchers in universities now love the term. “Virtual environments” are often considered synonymous with virtual reality; here, we emphasize that a user perceives a virtual environment as data from a real environment that is collected in advance or a completely artificial world. Augmented reality (AR) systems typically overlay virtual visuals on the user’s real world with cameras or glasses and pass them to the user’s eyes. Mixed reality (MR) is often used to refer to a collection of virtual implementations, augmented reality and real realisation worlds.

In recent times, the words VR/AR/MR have been widely used on various occasions. The term Telepresence (which is usually used for remote monitoring, video conferencing, but it’s not yet possible to translate it here) refers to systems that make users feel like they are in another place in the real world. If the user can also control the drone remotely, for example, we use the term Teleoperation. In this book, the words mentioned in this paragraph are regarded as a specific form of virtual reality. The most important point of virtual reality is that users’ perception of the world has been tampered with by technical means.

As for the user’s perception of the world, it is not so important whether the world is “real” or completely “virtual”. So “perception engineering” is another synonym for virtual reality. On the other hand, the word “virtual reality” is logically contradictory, since “virtual” and “reality” are themselves antonyms. There are philosophers who have proposed the use of virtuality in order to correct this error. We acknowledge the existence of these logical contradictions, but we still use the word “virtual reality”. The following two definitions are very important. “The real world” refers to the real world of the real world at that point in time, and “the virtual world” refers to the designed virtual reality experience that the user perceives.

In recent times, the words VR/AR/MR have been widely used on various occasions. The term Telepresence (which is usually used for remote monitoring, video conferencing, but it’s not yet possible to translate it here) refers to systems that make users feel like they are in another place in the real world. If the user can also control the drone remotely, for example, we use the term Teleoperation. In this book, the words mentioned in this paragraph are regarded as a specific form of virtual reality. The most important point of virtual reality is that users’ perception of the world has been tampered with by technical means.

As for the user’s perception of the world, it is not so important whether the world is “real” or completely “virtual”. So “perception engineering” is another synonym for virtual reality. On the other hand, the word “virtual reality” is logically contradictory, since “virtual” and “reality” are themselves antonyms. There are philosophers who have proposed the use of virtuality in order to correct this error. We acknowledge the existence of these logical contradictions, but we still use the word “virtual reality”. The following two definitions are very important. “The real world” refers to the real world of the real world at that point in time, and “the virtual world” refers to the designed virtual reality experience that the user perceives.

Interactivity (Interactivity) Most VR experiences have a very important component: interactivity. Will the generated simulation signal change depending on the actual behavior of the experiener? Or does the user perceive virtual world give feedback on the different behaviors of the experiencers? If the answer is no, such VR systems are often called open-loop; conversely, closed-loop (closed-loop). In a closed-loop virtual reality experience, the experience can partially control the virtual scene, which changes as the body moves, including the movement of the eyes, head, hands and legs. Other possible ways of interaction include voice control, heart rate changes, skin conductivity (is the experience sweating?) etc.

First vs. Third-Person, you most likely want to create a virtual reality device or experience. If so, pay special attention to this next point. When scientists use organisms to experiment, the subject of the experiment (creature) acquires a first-person experience, and the scientist is a third-person spectator. Scientists carefully design virtual reality systems to argue their scientific assumptions. For example, does it affect the ability to navigate by turning off some of the nerves in the brain of a mouse? On the other hand, when engineers or programmers create a system or software for virtual reality, they usually assume that they or someone similar to themselves are experiencers. They will be first-person experiencers and third-person developers who will constantly switch between the two roles to correct and improve their work. Here, we do not advocate this practice.

System creators evaluate system effects with great bias, because subjectively they do not want to rework many times, so they usually unconsciously improve the evaluation of experience effects. On the other hand, they know what the system they design is trying to achieve, and therefore are not as objective as an experienced person who is completely unaware. Further, developers will gradually adapt both physically and mentally to the shortcomings of the system. After a long time, they will not even be aware of the shortcomings themselves. We’ve seen a lot of similar situations before. For example, it is difficult to estimate what others say about your writing. At the same time, it is difficult for you to find errors in your writing, and it is relatively easier to find errors in others. In virtual reality, this effect is stronger and more elusive, and therefore requires special care. Be particularly careful when you deceive your senses, after all, you were completely confident in them in your previous life, which is probably a whole new field for you. More real virtual reality experiences than the real world should be more “real”? It should be as similar as possible to our real physical world. This rule is called the Universal Law of Simulation.

All interactions in the real world can be simulated in virtual reality. Our brains are familiar with these interactions, so they should be reproduced as naturally as possible. This rule sometimes dominates the video game industry, for example, when developing highly realistic first-person shooters, we’re constantly improving graphics performance to render more detailed game scenes. But there are other extreme examples, sometimes cartoon games are more popular with users. There are many such examples in history.

As a virtual reality developer, you should carefully evaluate your tasks, goals and experiences you want to create for users. You have the opportunity to create a virtual experience better than the real world. What will users do in the virtual world? For different goals, developers should think carefully about how users’ needs change. For example, how users would write code in virtual reality. In the real world, users can only knock code in a window in a large display. Even this experience that we have become accustomed to is unbelievable for people in the 1950s.

In virtual reality, we can also create a scene where users feel like they’re sitting on a big screen and writing code. But this does not take full advantage of virtual reality. In virtual reality, we might be able to create new ways to write code. For example, we can set aside the display, let the window appear directly in an isolated beach or forest, or even let the debugger show the process in a new way. Simulation or acquisition. In order to create a virtual world, we usually have two very different methods. On the one hand, we can use real-world geometric and physical laws to create a world of simulation.

This is similar to the way used in the video game industry today, and it was the mainstream method of generating virtual worlds in the early years. On the other hand, we can use imaging systems to record what the real world looks like. Using the camera to capture images and then display them on the screen to the user, a way that has existed for more than a century. To expand this traditional approach, we can use the camera to capture panoramic images and then play them from different viewpoints to the user in virtual reality. But in the vast majority of cases, a lot of information has been lost in the process of projecting the real world onto the camera’s image plane. What if the user moves his head while watching? In this case, we need to collect more information. With the depth sensor and simultaneous localization and mapping technology, we can capture and maintain a constantly updated 3D world, which can solve the problem of head movement. However, in current technical conditions, it is difficult to maintain an accurate and reliable real-world 3D model unless the captured environment is pre-arranged, for example, a motion capture studio.

As for interaction between users, it is important to track the movement of the user’s body, which is also a collection in a sense. What is the expression of a user when wearing a VR device? Do we need to know the user’s gestures? How can we know how the user’s mood changes? Where is the user’s eye focus? Users can generate an avatar in the virtual world, which makes it possible for users to interact with the virtual world while maintaining anonymity, which is important in some applications. Attention and emotional changes in the virtual double can be synthesized by technical means. We can even track the movement of the user’s body so that the virtual double can act accordingly. But there is still a problem with this. There is a well-known theory called “Uncanny Valley of Terror,” and when virtual alias are too real, humans feel strong disgust and anxiety. Under existing technology, it is difficult for users to interact with other users in the virtual world as naturally as in the real world, and in most cases we do not want it.

All VR systems need to meet a basic requirement: ensuring the health and safety of users. Unlike traditional media such as radio and television, virtual reality can fully dominate the senses and brains of users, making it easier to feel fatigue or nausea. This phenomenon, known as simulator sickness, has been studied for decades. In this book, we refer to this discomfort caused by virtual reality as VR sickness. Sometimes user discomfort is caused by virtual reality hardware or underlying software; however, in most cases, this discomfort is due to the possible side effects of virtual reality being misunderstood or disregarded by the developer of virtual reality. That’s why much of this book is related to human physiology and perceptual psychology.

To develop a good virtual reality experience, you must have a sufficient understanding of this content. In many cases, users are vulnerable to fatigue because the brain takes more effort to understand sensory signals that are not the same as usual. In some cases, users may even feel dizzy and nausea because the signals perceived by an organ are not consistent with expectations or with signals from other organs. Users can also easily feel fatigue if interaction in the experience requires a lot of muscle movement. For example, in a sandbox game, users need to move their arms frequently to move things. This quickly leads to fatigue and triggers a phenomenon called “gorilla arms”, where users feel that their arms are unusually heavy. This is because users have become accustomed to using the mouse to move objects in the virtual world. In the past, users only need to move the mouse or game controller easily to move objects in the virtual world. When the user experience is long enough, the brain adapts gradually, and this fatigue is greatly reduced.